Methods and Strategies: The Reflective Assessment Techniqueby: Cathleen Kennedy, Kathy Long, and Arthur Camins

Journal ArticleDigital resources are stored online in your NSTA Library.

Teachers often rely on student questions, their observations of students at work, and their own intuition to monitor how well students are learning. However, the authors found that teachers learn more about their students when they use the four-step Reflective Assessment Technique that draws on guided teacher reflections to inform classroom decision-making. This article describes this new and efficient technique for evaluating in-class student work.

Grades
  • Elementary
Publication Date
12/1/2009

Community ActivitySaved in 395 Libraries

Reviews (3)
  • on Thu Aug 18, 2011 12:19 PM

This article describes the four steps these authors provide to use reflection by the teacher to improve student learning experiences. This approach is described with sample work from students and teacher assessment to concept achievement. The authors use FAST from FOSS kit activities. After the teacher reflects on students learning, the teacher must then adjust his or her teaching plans to help students clarify their understandings. This seems like a great idea if teacher are willing to do this because it takes time.

Adah  (San Antonio, TX)
Adah (San Antonio, TX)

  • on Fri May 20, 2011 8:14 AM

This article presents a technique to increase student learning and understanding. The authors present a four step process (anticipate, review, reflect, adjust) to focus on the teacher’s reflection of a learning activity. By focusing attention on student responses and the targeted learning goals, teachers can implement “next steps” for students to clarify their understanding.

Kathy Sparrow  (Delray Beach, FL)
Kathy Sparrow (Delray Beach, FL)

  • on Fri May 20, 2011 8:12 AM

This article presents a technique to increase student learning and understanding. The authors present a four step process (anticipate, review, reflect, adjust) to focus on the teacher’s reflection of a learning activity. By focusing attention on student responses and the targeted learning goals, teachers can implement “next steps” for students to clarify their understanding.

Kathy Sparrow  (Delray Beach, FL)
Kathy Sparrow (Delray Beach, FL)


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