Guest Editorial: Inquiry Is Essentialby: Rodger W. Bybee

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An opinion piece about teaching children science as inquiry and the challenges to elementary teachers. One specific challenge is incorporating full inquiries as part of the school science program. With the process described here, elementary teachers can complement their use of hands-on lessons with full inquiries.

Grades
  • Elementary
Publication Date
3/1/2011

Community ActivitySaved in 670 Libraries

Reviews (13)
  • on Sat Feb 02, 2019 7:21 PM

This is a great article that explains how to use inquiry in your classroom. The inquiry provides an opportunity for students to be engaged, explore, explain, elaborate, and evaluate when they are learning. It is great that the inquiry will help the children to ask questions in the natural world. They will use evidence to answer the questions and make a connection between observation and evidence. The essential feature of the inquiry focuses on observations and their role as data and evidence. The students will be able to make accurate observations. The students are able to communicate and support their answers using evidence. Children can complete their investigation by stating a clearly focused question. The inquiry can help the students develop more self-direction as they pursue full inquiries. Inquiry is important to science. This is a great article that helps the teacher with hand-on lessons with full inquiries. This will help the students to be more self-directed and less teacher directed.

Cynthia
Cynthia

  • on Sun Dec 10, 2017 11:04 AM

I love that the focus is learner directed rather than teacher directed.

Mallory Van Winkle
Mallory Van Winkle

  • on Wed Nov 30, 2016 11:40 AM

This is a great article that talks about how to use inquiry in your classroom. This article will really help you better learn how to keep your students engaged in your lessons. By using the inquiry approach this will better keep the attention of your students. Through this article I have learned many approaches that I cannot wait to try when I have a classroom.

Anna Walker
Anna Walker

  • on Wed Nov 30, 2016 11:40 AM

This is a great article that talks about how to use inquiry in your classroom. This article will really help you better learn how to keep your students engaged in your lessons. By using the inquiry approach this will better keep the attention of your students. Through this article I have learned many approaches that I cannot wait to try when I have a classroom.

Anna Walker
Anna Walker

  • on Wed Nov 30, 2016 11:40 AM

This is a great article that talks about how to use inquiry in your classroom. This article will really help you better learn how to keep your students engaged in your lessons. By using the inquiry approach this will better keep the attention of your students. Through this article I have learned many approaches that I cannot wait to try when I have a classroom.

Anna Walker
Anna Walker

  • on Sun Nov 27, 2016 10:50 PM

This article spells out just how important inquiry is in the classroom. In today's classroom, we know our students' engagement is our priority, because without engagement, there is usually not much learning going on. This article is helpful because it explains why inquiry can help engage our students and make our class times together more beneficial.

Gloria S
Gloria S

  • on Mon Oct 17, 2016 9:47 PM

Just like inquiry is essential in science, this article is essential for teachers! It explains the importance of making your science lessons based on questions that you give your students and questions that they come up with on their own. Something that I have recently learned and was reminded of was that inquiry lessons allow students to be engaged, explore, explain, elaborate and evaluate what they are trying to discover. The article gives great examples of how a question should be worded so it is open-ended and researchable. The chart that is included within the article perfectly represents how much the teacher should or should not be involved in an inquiry lesson depending on what grade they are teaching. The older the students are, the less direction should be given by the teacher. However, the younger the students are, the more guidance the teacher may have to provide. I would recommend this article to anyone needing to get a better understanding of why inquiry is essential to learning.

Morgan Salmon  (Stillwater, OK)
Morgan Salmon (Stillwater, OK)

  • on Sat Jun 14, 2014 2:33 PM

As a special education teacher my focus has always been to develop the functional skills of my students. The ability to develop inquiry skills in my students always seemed daunting. Now this article makes it easier for me to differentiate and scaffold the inquiry process. The grid on learner vs. teacher directed inquiry is very valuable.

Margaret Stout
Margaret Stout

  • on Fri Nov 22, 2013 10:43 AM

This article is written by a very well known educator. With this said the article is a prime example of what inquiry is and how it might be seen in a classroom from simple to the ultimate inquiry situation. Today, the words inquiry have been replaced in the Next Generation Science Standards with the words ‘scientific practices’ but the new words still represent what was formerly called inquiry. This is a great article for a science department in any school to use to review what teachers should be doing in the classroom during a department meeting.

Adah  (San Antonio, TX)
Adah (San Antonio, TX)

  • on Mon Apr 11, 2011 7:33 AM

This is a great article for teachers new to inquiry or wanting to review its fundamentals. Children need to learn science not only hands-on, but also through inquiry. Teachers can use this as a guide to know what to include in a full inquiry lesson..

Kathy Sparrow  (Delray Beach, FL)
Kathy Sparrow (Delray Beach, FL)

  • on Thu Oct 13, 2016 2:36 PM

As a pre-service elementary teacher about to enter her student teaching semester, I found this article to be very informational about inquiry lessons. I especially appreciated the chart in Figure 1 which shows five different scenarios ranging from almost completed learner directed to completely teacher directed. I found it helpful that the article provided the five essential features of inquiry as well as how inquiry learning should look in the classroom when the students are engaged in “full inquiries” (p. 8). Overall, this article provided me with very useful information which I look forward to incorporating into lesson plans for my future elementary classrooms.

Amber LaFerriere
Amber LaFerriere

  • on Mon May 04, 2015 8:05 PM

This was a very interesting and insightful article. Dr. Bybee provides excellent information that teachers can use to make their classroom lessons more student oriented and less teacher directed. Dr. Bybee provides a schema that is an excellent tool to use while writing or revising a lesson plan.

Jessica S
Jessica S

  • on Thu Apr 30, 2015 10:49 PM

This article was a real eye opener; it made me become more aware of what to incorporate into lesson plans. It is a good guide to help one recall what it takes to make a well rounded lesson for students to get the most out it. This article gives reasoning and suggestions with examples to make sure we fully grasp the concept.

Jessica R
Jessica R


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