The Poetry of Science: Force, Motion, and Energyby: Sylvia Vardell and Janet Wong

Journal ArticleDigital resources are stored online in your NSTA Library.

Building literacy in playful, meaningful ways. The poem in this month's article shows us everyday uses of energy, force, and motion.

Grades
  • Elementary
Publication Date
7/1/2018

Community ActivitySaved in 2 Libraries

Reviews (6)
  • on Wed Apr 24, 2019 5:32 PM

It is very important to integrate different learning subjects to involve all of the students' learning interest. The article used a simple poem about a wagon called Push Power. The article then brakes down how to use this poem and apply it for students in five simple steps for students to understand force, motion, and energy in every day uses. I would apply this particular poem into my science class and use the poem to attract students who are not interested in science but love literature. This form of teaching force, motion, and energy to students really give learning science a different perspective. It is being looked through the lenses of someone who enjoys reading and literature. It is very important to integrate different subjects together.

Kassy M
Kassy M

  • on Wed Apr 24, 2019 5:32 PM

It is very important to integrate different learning subjects to involve all of the students' learning interest. The article used a simple poem about a wagon called Push Power. The article then brakes down how to use this poem and apply it for students in five simple steps for students to understand force, motion, and energy in every day uses. I would apply this particular poem into my science class and use the poem to attract students who are not interested in science but love literature. This form of teaching force, motion, and energy to students really give learning science a different perspective. It is being looked through the lenses of someone who enjoys reading and literature. It is very important to integrate different subjects together.

Kassy M
Kassy M

  • on Wed Apr 24, 2019 5:32 PM

It is very important to integrate different learning subjects to involve all of the students' learning interest. The article used a simple poem about a wagon called Push Power. The article then brakes down how to use this poem and apply it for students in five simple steps for students to understand force, motion, and energy in every day uses. I would apply this particular poem into my science class and use the poem to attract students who are not interested in science but love literature. This form of teaching force, motion, and energy to students really give learning science a different perspective. It is being looked through the lenses of someone who enjoys reading and literature. It is very important to integrate different subjects together.

Kassy M
Kassy M

  • on Wed Apr 24, 2019 5:31 PM

It is very important to integrate different learning subjects to involve all of the students' learning interest. The article used a simple poem about a wagon called Push Power. The article then brakes down how to use this poem and apply it for students in five simple steps for students to understand force, motion, and energy in every day uses. I would apply this particular poem into my science class and use the poem to attract students who are not interested in science but love literature. This form of teaching force, motion, and energy to students really give learning science a different perspective. It is being looked through the lenses of someone who enjoys reading and literature. It is very important to integrate different subjects together.

Kassy M
Kassy M

  • on Wed Apr 24, 2019 5:29 PM

Summary: This article discusses how to teach force, motion and energy using the poem Push Power by Janet Wong. There are five sections. The first is using pantomime to act out the pulling of the wagon with your hands and digging with your feet, and so on. The second step is to have students shout or say wait when it occurs in the poem in repeated reading and pause after the word but to cue students to chime in. The third step is to have students share experiences they have had with pulling/riding in a wagon, bike, or tricycle and asking students what gives these vehicles power. The fourth step is to talk to students about how the wagon shows use how the wagon in the poem shows use everyday uses of energy, force, and motion. Last, it says to link this poem to another poem about moving a wagon, “After I Make a Huge Mess with My Chemistry Set” by Mary Lee Hahn. Reflection: I really liked that this lesson incorporates English-Language Arts in the form of poetry. I also liked that it gets students engaged and thinking about the lesson. I also really enjoyed the fact that it relates force, motion, and energy to everyday life and that the lesson plan also relates to yet another poem that relates to the same lesson.

Paula Smithers
Paula Smithers

  • on Wed Apr 24, 2019 5:22 PM

The teacher will read a poem about a wagon being stuck in the mud, after the teacher reads the poem use pantomime to bring this poem to life, after acting it out, you coach students to say or even shout the word “wait” when it occurs in the poem. Read the poem and again and have the students act out the wait. Then have the students share experiences pulling or riding in a wagon or learning to ride a tricycle or bicycle. Finally, you talk about how the wagon in this poem shows us every day uses of energy, force, and motion. This article can be used to let the kids see and better understand how force, energy, and motion is used in everyday life. I also think it would be better if the students themselves act out the poem. It is a great poem to use in class. I would use it in the class to have the students represent the use of force, energy, and motion. The poem can also incorporate the use of ELA.

Ana Sanchez
Ana Sanchez


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