What Happens to Animals during Hurricanes?by: Marti Welch

Journal ArticleDigital resources are stored online in your NSTA Library.

Student curiosity provides a springboard for discussions ranging from weather, to conservation, to biology, and concern for animal welfare. Teachers can use these real-world events that spark students' interest to integrate content and interdisciplinary activities. Capture these teachable moments by using strategies within this article to foster a sense of compassion and duty within students to care for the environment.

Grades
  • Middle
Publication Date
2/1/2006

Community ActivitySaved in 109 Libraries

Reviews (4)
  • on Tue Jul 05, 2016 12:22 PM

This is a good resource to use when talking about storms. Many times students do have questions on what happens to the people and animals during a storm. For the most part we can tell students that people evacuate during a storm but this article helps students learn what happens to animals during a storm. This resource can be connected to weather, people, and animals. There are also resources available.

Jasmin
Jasmin

  • on Sat Aug 27, 2011 10:54 AM

Valuable article with numerous resources and ideas for connecting storms to pollution and its effect on animals. Students will enjoy the connections to weather, oceanography and animals tied to a community action. If you are looking for ideas to connect storms and people, this article is the place to start. No specific directions for activities are included, but you will find the extensive resource list helpful.

Patricia McGinnis  (Pottstown, PA)
Patricia McGinnis (Pottstown, PA)

  • on Tue Oct 02, 2018 12:38 PM

I am currently in the fourth year of my studies as an education major. I found this source to be helpful with my planning of my first unit on hurricanes. I am teaching my unit in a 6th grade classroom. My unit will begin with a focus on how animals are affected by hurricanes and what humans can do to help them and prevent them from dying. While a large part of this article focuses on ocean life and coral reefs, I still found it helpful how Marti Welch wrote about how we can open up students curiosity by beginning science units by talking about animals. He writes about how important it is to get students passionate about a subject before you try to have them do work and learn about it. This I agree with, the students in my classroom are ten times more productive when they are engaged and excited about a topic. While I did enjoy Mr. Welch’s connection of animals to engaging students, I found this article to be a little technical toward the middle, and a little hard to incorporate many of the facts into teaching. This article to me seems like it would be more helpful in teaching a larger unit about all animals and organisms that are affected by hurricanes and general bad weather across the earth. Still I did appreciate Mr. Welch’s ideas that he generated for this article on how to connect this learning to outside of the classroom. He mentions toward the end that an extension can be having students clean up their local parks which is a very important real world connection in my opinion.

Meghan Marcucci
Meghan Marcucci

  • on Tue Oct 02, 2018 12:38 PM

I am currently in the fourth year of my studies as an education major. I found this source to be helpful with my planning of my first unit on hurricanes. I am teaching my unit in a 6th grade classroom. My unit will begin with a focus on how animals are affected by hurricanes and what humans can do to help them and prevent them from dying. While a large part of this article focuses on ocean life and coral reefs, I still found it helpful how Marti Welch wrote about how we can open up students curiosity by beginning science units by talking about animals. He writes about how important it is to get students passionate about a subject before you try to have them do work and learn about it. This I agree with, the students in my classroom are ten times more productive when they are engaged and excited about a topic. While I did enjoy Mr. Welch’s connection of animals to engaging students, I found this article to be a little technical toward the middle, and a little hard to incorporate many of the facts into teaching. This article to me seems like it would be more helpful in teaching a larger unit about all animals and organisms that are affected by hurricanes and general bad weather across the earth. Still I did appreciate Mr. Welch’s ideas that he generated for this article on how to connect this learning to outside of the classroom. He mentions toward the end that an extension can be having students clean up their local parks which is a very important real world connection in my opinion.

Meghan Marcucci
Meghan Marcucci


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