A Literature-Circles Approach to Understanding Science as a Human Endeavor by: William Straits

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Unfortunately, the reading of science-related, historical nonfiction alone does not necessarily lead students to make personal connections to science or understand science as a human endeavor interdependent with culture, society, and history. Teachers must structure students’ reading to ensure that they consider specific aspects of science while reading and discussing books. One way for teachers to focus their students’ attention on components of the nature of science is through the use of literature circles.

Grades
  • Middle
Publication Date
10/1/2007

Community ActivitySaved in 81 Libraries

Reviews (7)
  • on Sun May 26, 2019 10:50 PM

This is a technique that I cannot wait to try in my future classroom. I believe that this is a great technique for reading from textbooks. Since textbook reading is considered boring by most students, they are often disengaged. I believe that by using literacy circles the students would become engaged and look at the material in different perspectives. Reading nonfiction is hard for elementary students to understand. This technique may also help break down the material so it is easier for the students to understand.

Autumn Rose
Autumn Rose

  • on Sun May 26, 2019 6:07 PM

This is a great approach to critiquing science in a meaningful way. The literature circles ensure that all students are involved and have a part to play, and it likely broadens their reading genres as well. Scientific vocabulary is bound to be present, and will be meaningful to students because they will have a story to connect those concepts to. As an avid reader, I would love to try this in my classroom. The possibilities are endless, as there is literature to be found on any subject!

Ashley Ericson
Ashley Ericson

  • on Thu May 23, 2019 7:22 PM

This is a great article! It had many different strategies to use inside the classroom to ensure your science instruction is effective. Literature circles are a great resource to use to encourage students to have confidence and share their thoughts with their peers!

Allison Finkbeiner
Allison Finkbeiner

  • on Thu May 23, 2019 7:22 PM

This is a great article! It had many different strategies to use inside the classroom to ensure your science instruction is effective. Literature circles are a great resource to use to encourage students to have confidence and share their thoughts with their peers!

Allison Finkbeiner
Allison Finkbeiner

  • on Thu May 23, 2019 7:22 PM

This is a great article! It had many different strategies to use inside the classroom to ensure your science instruction is effective. Literature circles are a great resource to use to encourage students to have confidence and share their thoughts with their peers!

Allison Finkbeiner
Allison Finkbeiner

  • on Thu May 23, 2019 8:17 AM

I think this article is a great resource for both first year teachers and veteran teachers. This walks readers through exactly how a literature circle in science class would operate, giving ideas for jobs that each student could hold in the circle to make sure that each student is remaining on task throughout the time spent in the group. I think this is an example of giving each student the chance to be the "genius" for a specific task. I always loved when I got to teach my friends something in school, and this gives each student in the group the chance to contribute something to the group that only they know. Very exciting!

Katie Hemmert
Katie Hemmert

  • on Sat May 18, 2019 11:53 AM

This article walks educators through an effective way to implement the strategy of literature circles in effective science instruction. I especially enjoyed the idea of assigning jobs to each student in the group so they are held accountable for specializing in something specific to contribute to the whole-group learning.

Megan  (Versailles, OH)
Megan (Versailles, OH)


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