Scope on Safety: Safety and liability by: Ken Roy

Journal ArticleDigital resources are stored online in your NSTA Library.

In order to provide a level of awareness relative to liability, the NSTA Board charged a committee with the task of rewriting the NSTA Position Statement on Liability of Science Educators for Laboratory Safety. This article outlines four basic questions for teachers to consider prior to engaging in potentially dangerous science activities. They are based on the language found in the position statement.

Grades
  • Middle
Publication Date
10/1/2008

Community ActivitySaved in 81 Libraries

Reviews (10)
  • on Sun Nov 27, 2016 11:08 PM

This article is helpful because it reminds me that In any classroom setting, my students' safety is my number one priority. Sometimes teachers can overlook possible health and safety risks, and we cannot afford to do that. We owe our students and their families the safest possible environment, proper equipment, and proper instruction on safely performing difficult experiments.

Gloria S
Gloria S

  • on Fri Nov 18, 2016 1:52 PM

This article makes me understand how as teachers we need to be 100% prepared. It is vital that educators not only plan, but they are educated on the codes and liabilities. Learning should be fun, but safety is and should be our number one concern. This article is definitely a great reminder that we have an obligation to not only our students, but our school board as well.

Katherine White
Katherine White

  • on Thu Nov 10, 2016 8:28 AM

This short and brief read article is a great read for new teachers, experienced teachers, and even administrators because it provides examples of safe learning environments for students in a classroom. The author gives four questions a middle school science teacher should have answered to themselves before beginning a blood typing experiment with the students in order to avoid a lawsuit. Being a pre-service elementary school teacher and possibly a middle level teacher, this article is a great resource to remember before planning potentially controversial lesson plans so I can ensure my, and everyone involved, legal safety.

Becca Gartmann
Becca Gartmann

  • on Thu Nov 10, 2016 8:28 AM

This short and brief read article is a great read for new teachers, experienced teachers, and even administrators because it provides examples of safe learning environments for students in a classroom. The author gives four questions a middle school science teacher should have answered to themselves before beginning a blood typing experiment with the students in order to avoid a lawsuit. Being a pre-service elementary school teacher and possibly a middle level teacher, this article is a great resource to remember before planning potentially controversial lesson plans so I can ensure my, and everyone involved, legal safety.

Becca Gartmann
Becca Gartmann

  • on Thu Nov 10, 2016 8:28 AM

This short and brief read article is a great read for new teachers, experienced teachers, and even administrators because it provides examples of safe learning environments for students in a classroom. The author gives four questions a middle school science teacher should have answered to themselves before beginning a blood typing experiment with the students in order to avoid a lawsuit. Being a pre-service elementary school teacher and possibly a middle level teacher, this article is a great resource to remember before planning potentially controversial lesson plans so I can ensure my, and everyone involved, legal safety.

Becca Gartmann
Becca Gartmann

  • on Thu Nov 10, 2016 2:37 AM

This article provides a set of quick and easy information that is important for teachers to know where safety and liability is involved. It talks about the legal responsibilities of the teacher, and how it is up to them to ensure that they are maintaining a safe classroom environment where science activities may take place safely for the students. The information in this article is excellent for future teachers to know about since it will provide them with the tools to become better prepared within the science classroom. The only complaint I would have about this article is that it is too short. If it contained more information about legal responsibilities, or more ideas on how to provide a safer classroom environment then that would be great.

JEROD MOORE
JEROD MOORE

  • on Wed Jun 20, 2012 12:25 PM

This very short article describes some practical approaches to creating a safe environment for students to perform experiments and science activities. Included in the complete list of suggestions there are some for school boards. Often these are already in place and if the district is large enough there would be a science supervisor to oversee this.

Adah  (San Antonio, TX)
Adah (San Antonio, TX)

  • on Fri Nov 18, 2016 1:52 PM

This article really made me think about how important it is to always have the student’s safety as the first priority. It is easy to assume that something may be safe, but if you ask yourself the essential questions listed in the article before conducting a scientific activity, you will be preparing yourself for a safe learning experience. It is better to be over cautious than not cautious enough.

Acathea Peterson  (Jenks, OK)
Acathea Peterson (Jenks, OK)

  • on Fri Nov 18, 2016 1:40 PM

This article was a great reminder that no matter what situation we are in as teachers, we should always consider our student’s safety first. As teacher’s we should always prepare ahead of each lesson for any potential safety hazards. It is our obligation as teachers to choose wisely when planning any type of lesson or experiment. If at any time we find that our student’s safety may be at risk, then this lesson should be revised with those issues in mind, or an alternate experiment should be prepared in its place.

Stella Carr
Stella Carr

  • on Tue Nov 08, 2016 2:20 PM

As a pre-service elementary teacher about to enter student teaching, I feel that this article has the potential to be a great resource for teachers, administrators, and school boards. This article is extremely short and feels, at least to me, to be a bit vague. I would like to see more concrete examples of what should be done by teachers, school administrators, and the school board to provide a safe learning environment for students. Additionally, I would have liked to have seen a clearer plan of what the example teacher should have done and how it meets each of the four steps. It would also be helpful to have a summarizing paragraph about what the NSTA Position Statement on Liability of Science Educators for Laboratory Safety is saying in layman's terms because I feel the statement itself is written in a legal style that can be difficult to interpret. I believe that with these adjustments, this article could receive 5 stars and be a worthwhile resource for a variety of people.

Amber LaFerriere
Amber LaFerriere


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