Classroom Management: Setting Up the Classroom for Learningby: Donna R. Sterling

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Student learning is directly related to classroom control established the first week of school (Wong and Wong 2001)—what you do the first day counts, and what you do the first 10 minutes counts even more. This article shares the advanced planning aspects of classroom management that should be in place before students enter the classroom for the first time: the physical environment; routines, policies, and procedures; materials management; as well as a review process to extend what students learn.

Grades
  • Middle
Publication Date
7/1/2009

Community ActivitySaved in 452 Libraries

Reviews (10)
  • on Mon Nov 27, 2017 12:15 PM

This is a very well written and organized article that does a great job going through all of the processes that make a classroom run efficiently. The main take away is to plan ahead and think about the flow of the class. As a pre-service teacher, this article has really got me thinking about the importance of ground rules and how a classroom is physically laid out. Very Informative!

Derrick Walter  (Kent, OH)
Derrick Walter (Kent, OH)

  • on Mon Oct 30, 2017 3:05 PM

I really enjoyed this article and it brought up some things that I am only beginning to see in the classroom. I think one of the big takeaways for me is that classroom management gives you better control of class and gives students expectations and conditions to work under. Being aware of inefficiencies and creating systems for each aspect of the classroom from desk positioning to equipment positioning is critical for management. I think even one way that I have seen my own inefficiencies is passing papers back to students. It takes time to go to each student and hand them back their paper which can end up wasting . Also, knowing that every decision you make creates an expectation to your students for better or worse is something to always consider.

Stephen S  (Akron, OH)
Stephen S (Akron, OH)

  • on Mon Oct 30, 2017 3:05 PM

I really enjoyed this article and it brought up some things that I am only beginning to see in the classroom. I think one of the big takeaways for me is that classroom management gives you better control of class and gives students expectations and conditions to work under. Being aware of inefficiencies and creating systems for each aspect of the classroom from desk positioning to equipment positioning is critical for management. I think even one way that I have seen my own inefficiencies is passing papers back to students. It takes time to go to each student and hand them back their paper which can end up wasting . Also, knowing that every decision you make creates an expectation to your students for better or worse is something to always consider.

Stephen S  (Akron, OH)
Stephen S (Akron, OH)

  • on Wed Aug 15, 2012 9:20 AM

This article has some very good basic ideas for good classroom management. It is written in a very direct, easy to read manner.

Betty Paulsell  (Kansas City, MO)
Betty Paulsell (Kansas City, MO)

  • on Wed Aug 08, 2012 2:54 PM

In this article, teachers will find some excellent ideas to improve classroom management processes in any classroom. The article address various areas of the school day, including the beginning of class, collecting assignments, and how to arrange seats. This is a fantastic article for new and experienced teachers alike!

Maureen Stover  (Fayetteville, NC)
Maureen Stover (Fayetteville, NC)

  • on Fri May 04, 2012 3:55 PM

This article was used with a workshop for new teachers and everyone was really appreciative of the information. Easy to read and very practical for the novice.

Yolanda Smith-Evans  (Houston, TX)
Yolanda Smith-Evans (Houston, TX)

  • on Tue Aug 09, 2011 10:24 PM

A great article for newer teachers!! This article contains numerous classroom management tips, procedure set-up information/suggestions and information on how to evaluate how you are doing, including how to use peer observations. The questions within the article, such as how you plan to distribute graded tests, force even the more experienced teachers to think about their current method to ascertain if there isn’t a better way. The article can help newer and more experienced teachers plan for a successful school year.

Susanne Hokkanen  (Orland Park, IL)
Susanne Hokkanen (Orland Park, IL)

  • on Sun Jul 03, 2011 6:16 PM

Here's what I learned from reading this journal article: -Make sure your environment is not too glitzy or cluttered. It should be organized. -Try not to be at the short end of a long room. Students pay attention better when you are closer to them. -Students should not have their backs to you. -Lab safety rules should first be signed by parents. -When students enter the room, they should know what to do, not just get ready. -Use closure activities.

Sarah
Sarah

  • on Mon Mar 28, 2011 9:05 AM

An argument that many teachers make to explain why they do not use more inquiry activities is classroom control. Good classroom management strategies help in reducing this problem. The author suggests that students need challenging, but doable activities. They should record their findings in science journals. By working in lab groups, students can monitor each other using positive peer pressure. It is also important to guide students in reflecting on their own learning. Classroom organization is also a must. The author recommends organizing resources in kits

Ruth Hutson  (Westmoreland, KS)
Ruth Hutson (Westmoreland, KS)

  • on Tue Mar 26, 2013 3:31 PM

I really enjoyed this article about classroom management for middle school. It covered all areas for effective management. The biggest one I felt was really important and implementing on the first day is the expectations of routines, policies and procedures for following class rules, participation and mostly safety. Sending home safety rules for the students and parents is a wonderful idea and one that even my high school children still do. Expectations for starting class and then getting the students' attention I think is also pertinent in classroom management. However, keeping their attention particularly if the subject is "boring" can be trying as well! Moving their desks around to help with keeping their attention was a good idea as well. I think it would possibly be beneficial to rearrange them now and then to change things up! For me it would be like when I rearrange my living room furniture it brings a whole different but intriguing feel. In my opinion, as far as distributing and collecting papers should be delt with delicately. Science has never been a forte of mine and I remember teachers handing back corrected papers and the embarassment I felt when I got the one with the giant red F or a lot of red marks! Especially if a special needs child is being mainstreamed into this class, they too already feel the pressure to be like the "normal" kids and getting a marked up paper back from the teacher or worse yet allowing another student to distribute them back can have negative feelings on that child. Keeping all the students engaged from the beginning to the clean-up at the end as suggested in this article should lead to success in a manageable classroom!

Angelica Johnson  (Billings, Mt)
Angelica Johnson (Billings, Mt)


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