The Structures and Properties of Carbonby: Olivia M. Castellini, George C. Lisensky, Jennifer Ehrlich, Greta M. Zenner, and Wendy C. Crone

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The four main forms of carbon—diamond, graphite, buckyballs, and CNTs—are an excellent vehicle for teaching fundamental principles of chemical bonding, material structure, and properties. Carbon atoms form a variety of structures that are intrinsically connected to the properties they exhibit. Educators can take advantage of this striking relationship between atomic structure and material properties to address several Physical Science Standards (9-12), including Structure of Atoms and Structure and Properties of Matter
(NRC 1996, p. 178). This article discusses two new allotropes of carbon that are important for nanotechnology—buckyballs and CNTs—and related activities for the classroom.

Grades
  • High
Publication Date
12/1/2006

Community ActivitySaved in 131 Libraries

Reviews (2)
  • on Wed Jun 08, 2011 12:21 PM

Being chemistry major has made this article more interesting for me. I was unaware of the forth allotrope of carbon structure called CNT or carbon nanotubes. This article describes how they are created and their uses. The article also provides other resources for classroom activities related to CNT. This article while helpful to a college professor might also be useful for an AP Chemistry class in high school.

Adah  (San Antonio, TX)
Adah (San Antonio, TX)

  • on Wed Jun 08, 2011 12:20 PM

9) Being chemistry major has made this article more interesting for me. I was unaware of the forth allotrope of carbon structure called CNT or carbon nanotubes. This article describes how they are created and their uses. The article also provides other resources for classroom activities related to CNT. This article while helpful to a college professor might also be useful for an AP Chemistry class in high school.

Adah  (San Antonio, TX)
Adah (San Antonio, TX)


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