Rocks: Cycling

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Science Objects are two hour on-line interactive inquiry-based content modules that help teachers better understand the science content they teach. This Science Object is the third of four Science Objects in the Rocks SciPack. It explores the variables that contribute to rock transformation and the continuous processes of rock formation that constitute the rock cycle. The rock cycle provides an example of the transfer of energy and mass in the Earth system. Earth is a closed system containing essentially a fixed amount of each element. Movement of matter is driven by the Earth’s internal and external sources of energy, and is often accompanied by changes in the physical and chemical properties of the matter. Minerals are made, dissolved, and remade—on the Earth's surface, in the oceans, and in the hot, high-pressure layers beneath the crust. The total amount of material stays the same as its forms change.

Grades
  • Elementary
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Reviews (21)
  • on Thu Sep 10, 2015 4:26 PM

This lesson was really awesome. I enjoyed the graphs/diagrams and pictures. It really provided a wealth of information and the level of knowledge was good. I really enjoyed the overview of earth science. This was a Great resource. I really enjoyed the graphics and the diagrams. The information really addressed various levels of knowledge. The depth of knowledge was sufficient This interactive component of the resource was great!

Sheri Smith
Sheri Smith

  • on Tue Sep 08, 2015 8:36 PM

I forgot to mention, this article was helpful since 3rd graders learn about the rock cycle through rock and soil attributes and classifying the different types of rocks (igneous, metamorphic, and sedimentary).

Felicia A
Felicia A

  • on Tue Sep 08, 2015 8:30 PM

This article/object discussed the rock cycle as it pertains to the Earth's surface and system. The rock cycle consist of the how the different forms of rocks are created and transition into the different types of rocks. Since rocks cannot be destroyed, they are recycled through recurring sequence of rock cycling. Rocks continuously change through the different forces of the Earth (weathering, erosion, heat, pressure) over geological time. These different processes or forces changes the rocks from igneous to sedimentary to metamorphic.

Felicia A
Felicia A

  • on Mon Sep 07, 2015 6:31 PM

I found this resources very informational. Even through it was geared more for older students there was some information I could use with elementary students that I have never thought to introduce or reinforcing. Example: teaching them the prefixes bio, atom, hydro, etc. I have a better understanding of how each rock is recylced the analogy was great! I want to use them as I continue to teach science. It was a good reinforce resource for me.

Adriane Woods
Adriane Woods

  • on Thu Sep 03, 2015 4:23 PM

I must say that I really enjoyed the presentation on rock cycling. This was old but new learning for me all over again. A lot of the information that was presented was refreshing and brought back memories of my middle school years. You really don’t think about how mother earth’s campaign for recycling is ongoing and never stops until you have an assignment such as this that put you in remembrance of how important it is to take care of our precious earth. When you think about recycling most people only think about the parallel that was used when compared to recycling glass bottles. It was amazing to recall how weathering breaks down the rock into smaller pieces sediment and how the sediment is sorted and transported via wind, water, and gravity. I noticed that sedimentary rocks have many possible paths through the rock cycle; only one of which is to stay a sedimentary rock. FYI: I found it interesting to learn that the shortest possible path that an extrusive igneous rock could take to become an intrusive igneous rock is as follows: mmmmci (metamorphism>metamorphic rock> melting> magma> crystallization>Intrusive Igneous Rocks. Also, lastly to learn about the earths systems again was rewarding. I remembered that rock cycling takes place in the Geosphere.

Kizzy Amos
Kizzy Amos

  • on Sun Mar 15, 2015 9:08 AM

This science object is filled with more advanced information about where the energy comes from to fuel the process. Also explains the interactions of the various spheres in the process.

Robin Willig  (Rye Brook, NY)
Robin Willig (Rye Brook, NY)

  • on Wed Sep 03, 2014 5:46 AM

I really enjoy Science Objects. In 1-3 hours, the Rocks: Cycling Science Object will help me re-learn, refresh, or learn for the first time some critical science concepts I will have to know to obtain my Science Educator credentials. I appreciate that I can complete them at my own pace, and that, if used as park of a SciPack, I have access to a content expert to go to for help. The NSTA Learning Center Science Objects are very beneficial! Not only will they enrich my teaching, the knowledge will enrich my life.

Naomi Beverly  (Marietta, GA)
Naomi Beverly (Marietta, GA)

  • on Tue Dec 27, 2011 3:10 PM

Wonderful graphics and diagrams help the learner to visualize the cyclical process involved in rock formation. From the interactions of the hydrosphere, atmosphere, and biosphere, this resource does a nice job explaining the processes and environments, through which a ‘rock ‘may venture; clearly highlights that heat from the Earth and the sun drive the cycle. Great material to use to refresh content knowledge of the rock cycle, or to actively engage scholars in learning about cycling.

Lorrie Armfield  (Laurel, MD)
Lorrie Armfield (Laurel, MD)

  • on Tue Dec 27, 2011 3:09 PM

Wonderful graphics and diagrams help the learner to visualize the cyclical process involved in rock formation. From the interactions of the hydrosphere, atmosphere, and biosphere, this resource does a nice job explaining the processes and environments, through which a ‘rock ‘may venture; clearly highlights that heat from the Earth and the sun drive the cycle. Great material to use to refresh content knowledge of the rock cycle, or to actively engage scholars in learning about cycling.

Lorrie Armfield  (Laurel, MD)
Lorrie Armfield (Laurel, MD)

  • on Wed Sep 30, 2015 7:59 PM

This SciPak related the manner in which the earth recycles rock to a recycling project at a school. This aligning these processes will allow students and to understand the cycling process is seven steps. Additionally, this SciPak is helpful in helping students understand how the various types of rocks are formed and how the amount of rock contained on Earth does not change; just the forms and materials.

Charnita W
Charnita W

  • on Thu Sep 24, 2015 4:21 PM

The module was informative. I enjoyed the discussion about rocks and how heat causes changes. I learned interesting facts about metamorphic rocks For example: Metamorphic Rocks - Metamorphic rocks are formed by great heat and pressure. They are generally found inside the Earth's crust where there is enough heat and pressure to form the rocks. Metamorphic rocks are often made from other types of rock. For example, shale, a sedimentary rock, can be changed, or metamorphosed, into a metamorphic rock such as slate or gneiss. Other examples of metamorphic rocks include marble, anthracite, soapstone, and schist.

Linda Howard
Linda Howard

  • on Wed Sep 16, 2015 11:23 PM

Cycling was a great resource for teaching about the rock cycle. For this Scipack to be most effective in elementary it would need more kid friendly information, illustrations, and diagrams. The quizzes were a great way to assess your students understanding.

JeRita Humphrey
JeRita Humphrey

  • on Sun Sep 13, 2015 6:42 PM

In Georgia Elementary Schools, Rocks are primarily a third grade standards. This resource did an excellent job of explaining what students need to know for the standard, but goes much further. While some of the content may be difficult for some younger students, the article did a great job with use of diagrams to explain concepts. I especially enjoyed how they referred to rocks as a cycle. This resource really demonstrates how understanding rocks and rock cycling helps to understand Earth. It is a piece of the story of our planet.

Bianca Jones
Bianca Jones

  • on Sun Sep 13, 2015 6:11 PM

In my opinion, this SciPack was assembled well. I learned and relearned a lot of the material presented in the video. The Rock Cycle diagram was detail and easy to understand. I particularly like how the essential questions were stated at the end of the first part of the video. My favorite sections were the analogy and school project. From those sections I learned that cycling can be integrated with many science concepts and I never thought about teaching cycling as one concept by itself. Finally, the analogy section with the pictures of how glass and a rock starts will help anyone improve their understanding of the rock cycle.

Shereen Zimmerman
Shereen Zimmerman

  • on Thu Sep 10, 2015 3:55 PM

The sci pack was awesome! It really helps add a lot of content to teaching rocks and minerals. I think this is critical for teachers to know as they move through the unit. This can also help students understand how rocks develop during the rock cycle.

Gerard Latimore
Gerard Latimore

  • on Thu Sep 03, 2015 5:21 PM

I enjoyed this resource. They did an excellent job engaging and informing the audience about the rock cycle.

Tanya Barrett
Tanya Barrett

  • on Wed Sep 02, 2015 9:29 PM

I have enjoyed learning about Rocks:Cycling. As mentioned in the presentation, these lessons are usually taught during the Middle School years. As an Elementary Educator, the one important lesson that I learned was that the Rock Cycle is never ending. This cycle has no beginning, no end and no established path that a rock must take. This entire presentation served as a valuable learning opportunity for me. I also learned that the weathering of rocks involves more than just the weather. Any process that breaks down rocks is considered weathering. Going through this presentation has given me a greater appreciation for Earth Science.

Aisha Burchfield  (Covington, GA)
Aisha Burchfield (Covington, GA)

  • on Wed Sep 02, 2015 11:57 AM

The Science Pack is very helpful in describing the Rock Cycle. I believe the comparisons of the Rock Cycle to the recycling process is helpful to learners which need visual connections. I always enjoy teaching the rock and weather cycles to students. After completing the Science Pack, I recognize that I need to use more vocabulary when discussing internal and external changes such as biosphere, hydrosphere, atmosphere, and geosphere. This Science Pack is a great resource for high school students as well as adult learners.

Papillon  (Atlanta, GA)
Papillon (Atlanta, GA)

  • on Tue Nov 12, 2013 7:59 PM

nice at-home learning tool for students

Samantha  (Hoboken, NJ)
Samantha (Hoboken, NJ)

  • on Sun Jan 03, 2010 4:12 PM
  • on Tue Apr 08, 2014 11:30 PM

The SciPack was boring although it gave all the information that you would need to know about rocks and cycling. For most of it, I felt like I was just trudging along. However, the quizzes were helpful along the way to make sure that I was on the right track.

Kaylee Lemert
Kaylee Lemert


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